« The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Episode 54: The Boy Who Loved to Fly

2017-05-06 | 🔗

He flew into history - thanks to a nervous mother with an old-fashioned name.

This is an unofficial transcript meant for reference. Accuracy is not guaranteed.
Hey there it's micro- and this is the way I heard the only podcast for the curious mind with a short attention span. I've been thinking and rather than sell the incredibly valuable piece of real estate that precedes the unforgettable story. You're about to hear too many of my loyal sponsors this month, I'm gonna keep it for myself, so that I might suggest to you with great humility that you consider giving my book as a Christmas present like the story you're about to hear the book is called the way I heard it and modesty aside, I don't think you'll find a more appropriate gift out there. The reviews are,
excellent! It's an official New York Times best seller and everybody tells me they hear my voice in their head when they read it now. I don't know if that's enough, that's good thing or bad thing for weird thing, but it's definitely something: gotta micro dot com, slash book that micro dot com, slash book there, still a few autographed copies left if you'd like one just click on autographed copy stuff it in a stocking rapid and brown paper, more slap, a bow on my giant face and give it to somebody love or like, or somebody just simply feel obligated to buy a gift for either waits at Micro, dotcom, slash book. This is I heard the nervous mom with the old fashioned name, was getting the hard sell from a twelve year old son. Please mom
you gotta, let me go. It means the world to me. Captain Davis is the best pilot. Ever he says it's safe, please mom! Please, Paul's mother ran her fingers over the metal rivets on the Waco biplane and shook her head. The very idea that such a machine might actually take flight was hard to imagine, but Doug Davis was indeed an accomplished pilot and his confidence was undeniable. I've done this a thousand times, man I'll, have him back in no time a promise stencils on the side of the plane, Paul's mother noticed a woman's name whose Gina may she asked. The pilot smiled Well, that's my girl. He said we were married on Christmas Day and I flew or to our honeymoon in this very plain, the nervous mom with the old fashioned name side. Surely
A pilot who put his sweethearts name on the side of his plane had much to live for Paul could see his mother teetering, please mom can I fly with Captain Davis? Please eventually Paul's mom relented and watched with great trepidation as her little boy climbed aboard the genome. May you both be careful, she said and hurry back. It was early August a perfect day for flying. The skies were mostly clear and the winds favourable Paul fell to rush of excitement impossible to describe not just because this was his first flight. But because this was his first mission, Captain Davis gave the signal a volunteer spun the prop in the engine roared to life seconds later. The biplane thunder
across the open field, until the jarring bumps suddenly gave way to a gentle otherworldly glide Paul was transfixed. The wind stung his cheeks as the horizon, disappeared, revealing nothing but the. Why a blue yonder for the first time in his young life Paul felt completely and unambiguously free far. Although his friends and neighbors waited in anticipation, they look so small four hundred feet away, Paul hoisted the burlap sack into his lap and gripped it tightly in both fists. Now, Captain Davis now not yet Paul, the biplane climbed another hundred feet and started another slow circle above the eager crowd. Ok Paul get ready, Paul gripped the top of the sack with his right hand and clutched the bottom with his life. Then he leaned over the side and waited for the command. Ok
All bombs away, Paul dump the contents over the side and pull the empty sack back into his lap bombs away. He repeated in quiet, wonder instantly the air was filled with a hundred and fifty rice paper parachutes below each shoot. A delicious chocolate bar floated gently toward the earth, courtesy of the kurdish candy company, Captain Davis banked his aircraft away from the payload and back toward terra firma as the nervous mom, with the old fashioned name paste and bitter nails all around her children, squealed with delight ass. The fluttering battalion of sweets floated down from the Heavens for Doug Davis the lead pilots of the baby, Ruth flying Circus. It was just another routine flight and one of the most successful publicity stunts of all time.
For his twelve year old assistant, the experience was nothing short of transformational. That was the day. Paul became the boy who loved to fly a passion that would stay within the rest of his life and though she did know it. This was also the day that Paul's mother was destined to become a household name. It's interesting! Isn't it, the way men are often inspired to name their most precious things after the women they love. Those candy bars, for instance, were named for President Grover Cleveland daughter, Ruth the Curtis Candy Company was named for its founders, mother, Helen Curtis, Paul now, Four forgot, the thrill of his first flight or the real reason. His
Airbus mother allowed him to climb into a biplane with a perfect stranger. It wasn't the pilots, confidence or his own incessant begging. It was the presence of that girls name on the side of the plane. That's why? Twenty years later, when Paul flew into the history books, he did so in a brand new plane with an old fashioned name, a plain named after his dear old mom. It was early August,
a perfect day for flying. The skies were mostly clear and the winds favourable Paul felt the same rush of excitement. He always did whenever the propellers started to turn, but on this day the boy who loved to fly wasn't taking orders. He was giving them and when Colonel Paul tippets yelled bombs away, he wasn't dropping candy bars over Miami. He was dropping something altogether different from a plain called. The Enola gay over a town called Hiroshima. Anyway, that's wired.
Transcript generated on 2019-12-31.