« The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Episode 7: "Be right back, hon!"

2016-03-08 | 🔗

She believes her husband is a genius. The only problem, no one else does. How her road trip changed everything – for YOU!

This is an unofficial transcript meant for reference. Accuracy is not guaranteed.
Hey there. Micro- and this is the way I heard the only podcast for the curious mind with a short attention span- I've been through, king and rather than sell the incredibly valuable piece real estate that precedes the unforgettable story, you're about to hear too many my loyal sponsors this month, I'm going to keep it for myself, so that I might suggest to you with great humility that you consider giving my book as a Christmas present like the story you're about to here. The book is called the way I heard it and modesty aside, I don't think you'll find a more appropriate gift out there. The reviews are excellent it's an official New York Times best seller and every he tells me they hear my voice,
in their head when they read it now I don't know if that's that's good, good thing or bad thing for weird thing, but it's definitely something: gotta micro dot com, slash book, that's micro, dot, com, slash book, there's still a few autographed copies left if you'd like one just click on autographed copy stuff it in a stocking rapid and brown paper, more slap, a bow on my giant face and give it to somebody love or like or somebody just simply feel obligated to buy a gift for either waits at micro dot com, slash book. This is the way I heard. Bertha was married to a genius, a man who could see the future. A man destined to change the World Bertha believe this with absolute certainty. Problem was nobody else did like so many other great inventors birth is husband was a terrible business. Man.
Actual success had eluded him and now, as the family struggled to make ends meet birth could see him so being further and further into depression and self doubt something had to be done. So Bertha decided to take matters into her own hands. It was time to go, see mother. She woke the kids before dawn gathered supplies for the journey. She left a note for her husband, telling him not to worry, then she and her sons hit the road of course, hitting the road in those days was a tricky business, since there were no roads to speak of just endless miles of countryside between Bertha and Moms house, with a few villages and hamlets sprinkled in between the car, heaved and groaned and grappled for traction over the bumpy terrain, hills were channel so the two teenage boys that a lot of pushing as Bertha steered through the ruts left by horse drawn wagons. Before long they ran out of fuel.
There were no gas station, so Bertha height to a nearby pharmacy and bought some lie groin Petroleum base stain remove the just might keep the vehicle going. It did several hours later, the car once again ground to a halt. This time the problem was a In the few line, there was no trouble and no cell phones to call for help. So Bertha pulled out a hare, pin to clear out the clog mission accomplished a short time later: the cars Electra ignition: cable became worn through stopping them in their tracks. Bertha removed her garter and used it to enslave the wire and off they went just before dark around fifteen hours after leaving their house and her sons finally arrived at their destination Richard and huge and were thrilled to see their grandma and after supper. Bertha quickly explain the crisis that confronted her family, along with her plan to solve it birth, asthma
was sceptical of her daughters plan but supportive, nevertheless, and begged her daughter to take every precaution on the long ride back home. Her concern was just defied among the many other mishaps on the return trip. The cars breaks failed, so Bertha in that Macgyver would have applauded founded. Local shoemaker bought some leather strips and had them nailed onto the wooden break blocks problem solved when burthen and her son, and finally arrived back at the family home. Her husband was waiting in quiet, amazement, he wasn't alone. Word had spread far and wide of birth is journey, which, of course,
is precisely why she had taken it. In the first place, people needed to understand the possibilities of her husbands, invention and if he couldn't make them see the future, she would show to them. In the present, the newspapers had a field day at a time when the longest prior road trip was approximately forty four
this house, wife and mother of two took a one hundred twenty mile expedition that reversed the fortunes of her family and forever change the business of getting from here to there. That was the summer of eighteen. Eighty eight, the year the patent motor wagon, the brainchild of the man Bertha, believed in with absolute certainty. Carl bends. That's the name. We remember the inventor of the first horseless carriage powered by an internal combustion engine, but Bertha bends. That's the name. We should never forget, thanks to her Mercedes, Benz, still thriving, and anyone with a licence to drive today should think fondly of the intrepid Bertha, a daring young
lady who woke up one morning drove into history. Anyway. That's the way I heard it.
Transcript generated on 2019-12-31.