« The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Episode 102: The Manchester Cowboy

2018-05-15 | 🔗

This famous aspiring jockey just wanted to hear the roar of the crowd - but this was not the crowd he was expecting.

This is an unofficial transcript meant for reference. Accuracy is not guaranteed.
Hey, there's micro. This is the way I heard it's the only podcast for the curious mind with a short attention span: hey if you already picked up my book the way I heard it. Please accept my heartfelt thanks. I am grateful and if you liked it I'd, be grateful again. If you took a second to review it over at Amazon by publisher, says the reviews are really important and I'm trying to impress my publisher if having picked up a copy, you can find one at micro, dot, com, slash. Book. The book itself is a combination of stories from this podcast, interrupted by a series of story
from my own misspent youth and dubious career in the world of nonfiction television, eight brag, but it is New York Times best seller and my mom says it's. The feel good head of the holiday season had an about that, but we do have a few autographed copies left at micro, dotcom, Slash book and I'm told they would make ideal. Christmas presents hashtag just say and pick up a copy micro dotcom, Slash book stuff me in somebody stocking I'd, be grateful if the wired David's daydream, sort so different from the day dreams of any other aspiring jockey. He dreamed of speed he dreamed of winning he dreamed of, building, the clubhouse turn is a sold out crowd left to its feet and roared with unbridled enthusiasm. But on February ninth, one thousand nine hundred and sixty
Or as David stood in the wings of the Ed Sullivan Theatre, the handsome eighteen year old finally realised that old basil might have been right all along. He recalled their first exchange for years earlier, good day, Mister Foster, my name is David and I'm going to be the best jockey You ever trained put me on a horse and I'll show you what I can do. Basil foster considered the skinny kid standing before him and handed him a shovel show me what you can do with this said basil. My stalls are filled with horse. Crap, don't pick itself up after a few weeks of daily Shovelling David was allowed to groom the horses. Then he was allowed to feed horses and lead them around the paddock after their work out, David was anxious to ride, but never complained. He shut up early, stayed late and patiently completed every job that basil assigned him.
And on the day he was finally allowed to ride. One of battles- treasured thoroughbreds David's natural talents became undeniable good. Lord son where'd, you learn a ride like that back home, Mister Foster. They called me. The Manchester Cowboy under battles watchful Eye David skill on the back of a horse soon eclipsed that of many professional jockey,
with years of experience, there is just one problem one day while shovelling the endless piles of horse crap into the endless parade of wheelbarrows basil heard David singing good Lord boy, where did you learn to sing like that David jumped a foot in the air and whirled around sorry? Mister foster it I did know you're standing there, don't apologize! Son, keep on singing. You got real talent for that. They forward basil insisted that David sing whenever he was mocking out the stalls or feeding his horses or writing his horses. Because now basil was a believer. He knew that David's daydreams would eventually become a reality. He could see the sold out crowds leaping to their feet.
Roaring with unbridled enthusiasm. One day in a pub in London's West end basil, overheard producer talking about a new musical. He was in the midst of casting when the producer described. The role he was struggling to fill basil didn't hesitate, stop casting. He said I ve got your boy. Trust me back at the stables David was mortified. A play out. It would have been a play, Mr Foster, I wanna resources, but basil was relentless. He handed the boy, a train ticket to London and said This isn't a negotiation David Audition for this play come back when you're famous, the horses will still be here. So David went to London, an audition for the play and Justice Basle predicted David got the part of the artful dodger in a musical com
Oliver Oliver of Course went on to become a smash hit on the London stage, then a smash it on Broadway David was nominated for Tony Award and eventually invited onto the Ed Sullivan, show too being his signature song. I do anything in front of an audience of seventy three million people. In fact, you can watch his performance right now on Youtube. But if you, do remember those seventy three million viewers didn't tune. And to see an aspiring, jockey sing, a Broadway show tune. They turned into sea the act that followed David's performance, the four lads from Liverpool who, on that very same evening, made television history. That's what David Saul
as he stood in the wings of the Ed Sullivan theater February. Ninth, one thousand nine hundred and sixty four John Paul George and Ringo telling America. I want to hold your hand, but of course that's not what convinced him to forgo his dream of racing horses know that only happened when It looked out into the audience and saw a frenzied throng of hysterical and rapturous. Women come completely and totally unglued. That's the moment when David realized old basil might be onto something ultimately, David never lost his love of horses, even when he became a teenage heartthrob, even when his face
here on the covers of a hundred magazines, even when his popularity temporarily eclipsed that of John Lennon and Paul Macartney fact. Is the Manchester Cowboy never stop daydreaming about rounding the clubhouse turn, but thanks to his mentor, a daydream, Believer, nay, basil, foster. The aspiring jockey named Davy Jones would send the crew Leaping to their feet and roaring with unbridled enthusiasm not from the back of a horse, but from the front of a stage in a little band called the monkeys. Anyway. That's the I heard.
Transcript generated on 2019-12-30.