« The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Episode 84: A Very High Bar

2017-11-21 | 🔗

He was willing to play the white-man's game - he just wished they had told him the rules first.

This is an unofficial transcript meant for reference. Accuracy is not guaranteed.
The story about two years, true for the most part, so too Are the stories of my new book the way I heard it if you'd like an autograph copy, I've set a few aside for fans of the podcast which you can pick up at micro dot com, slash book? If you don't care about my autograph than go to micro, dotcom, Slash book anyway, to find them surprise. The book is available pretty much anywhere books or sold Barnes and Noble Walmart target books, a million hasn set of the place. Hudson has them Amazon, of course, but the prices change all the time. So click around at micro dot com to see
who's got what for how much the reviews? Raw pretty much five star, very flattering New York Times, calls at best seller. I think it would make a dandy Christmas present. People still say dandy anymore. I don't know, but your copy awaits at micro dotcom, Slash book. This is the way I heard what till hook watched from a distance as the men and underpants and funny shirts tried, but failed to jump over the Khyber dressed in work boots and heavy cover. All he was not exactly a tired for track or field, but would tell hook, was not inclined to make excuses. So when his classmates took a break, the newest student at the Carlyle Indian School jogged across the cinder track accelerated at the last moment and glided over the
bar with room to spare five feet: nine inches a new college record, a hundred yards away coach pop Warner dropped his clipboard in surprise and ran over to investigate coach Warner was always on the lookout for all talent and what he had just seen was impossible to ignore. Have you ever played football? The coach asked no said. Without hook, I've never played anything Coach Warner handed the young Indian, an odd, shaped ball and led him over to the scrimmage. He explained the drill in simple terms: the goal to run to the other end of the field without dropping the ball or being tackled by any of these men. You understand what tell hook nodded a dozen men spread out on the field before him coach blew a whistle and the young Indian sprang into action. He sidestep the first two men who try to bring him down and leaped over the next three. The remaining seven came out
like a wall, so would tell hook put his head down and accelerated was a bit like a bowling ball colliding with a cluster of unsuspecting pins he's Molly ran through them like a human battering ram and into the end zone. The new kid smiled at the flabbergasted coach and said nobody tackles Woodstock that season with, though hucks scored a record twenty five touchdowns for Carlisle and became the first collegians to rush for over two thousand yards with pop Warner's encouragement. He would go on to distinguish himself and track and field lacrosse boxing, tennis, wrestling and baseball, and just for grins he entered the intercollegiate ballroom dancing Competent vision and one that to whatever hook was so good at everything. Coach Warner insisted he try out for the: U S olympic team in nineteen twelve, so he did at the trial
does he dominated every event, except for the javelin, which he threw from a standing position. No untold would tell hook, he could have a running start. He came in second anyway, eight months later, in Sweden he went to gold medal and the Pentothal on the shot. Put the long jumped the high jump, the hundred metre, he was simply unstoppable. It was the Catalan, however, that separated would tell hook from every their athlete on the planet. Not only did he excel in all ten events, he beat the silver medalist by nearly seven hundred points and set a world record in the fifteen hundred metre race. His performance prompted King Gustaf to declare him the world's greatest athlete and the Associated Press agreed at weeds, but been around back then we'll tell hook would have surely been the first to appear on the front of their box. Northern again, maybe not.
Months after his triumph in Stockholm, the International Olympic Committee demanded the metals be returned, apparently would tell hook had been paid a few dollars to play baseball back when he was in school. No one told him about that rule either, but would tell hook was not inclined to make excuses, be gave the metals back and apologised for the confusion today, if you search the internet under whatever hooks christian name, the name people used to chant in stadiums all over the country, you'll find a faded photo taken a few minutes before his right good breaking performance. One hundred years ago, look closely at the man staring back at you and you'll see an expression rarely found on the face of the modern day, superstar a strange mix of pride and humility of certainty and amusement. It's the expression of a man,
who knows with absolute certainty, he's about to win a gold medal running in someone else's shoes, it's true would tell hooks shoes were stolen on the second day of the Catalan, so he and pop Warner rummage through trash cans and so they found some replacements. They were mismatched and the wrong size. So a toe hook, war extra socks to compensate look at his left foot and the photo and you'll see for yourself the man whose indian name meant bright path set a world record and one a goal. Metal running in shoes. He found in a dumpster, fame comes and goes, and records are made to be broken. But if true greatness is to be celebrated, let's not forget the first man to be dubbed the world's greatest athlete a true champion who
gold medals were eventually returned and whose face finally made it onto a box of weeds. Ninety years after he stunned the world a proud man who was not inclined to make excuses, a man still remembered by some as Jim Thorpe. That's the way I heard it.
Transcript generated on 2019-12-31.